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MMR Vaccine Changes Are Coming

by Sue Hubbard, M.D.

There is always a lot of news about vaccines, especially this year with the need for two different flu vaccines to provide protection against both seasonal influenza and novel H1N1 (swine flu). But another newsworthy story involves the vaccines to prevent measles, mumps and rubella (MMR).

images-3The MMR II vaccine is typically give given to infants at their 12 month check up. It has been given for over 30 years, and as a result, the incidence of these diseases has decreased dramatically since that time. But in recent years there had been “concern” by some that the MMR vaccine was one of the “causes” of autism. Due to this “unfounded and unsubstantiated” concern, some parents had opted not to give their children MMR vaccine, while others had decided to spread out the doses by giving individual components of the vaccine. In other words, the parents, and some doctors, gave mumps, measles, and rubella vaccine as individual vaccines separated by weeks to months. This decision puts more children at risk for acquiring these diseases that have not been eradicated, especially in other parts of the world and can be imported into the U.S. by international travel.

Such was the case in 2006 when there was a mumps outbreak in the U.S. and in 2008 there was a measles outbreak across this country. In the measles outbreak, the first case was imported to California by an unvaccinated child who had been in Switzerland and acquired the measles virus and become ill upon his return to the U.S. This is again an example that the re-emergence of these diseases is always a threat in unvaccinated or partially vaccinated children.

Due to the fact that there were different vaccines available, some being MMR combination and other single disease vaccines there was even more concern that children would not be adequately vaccinated, and that there could be widespread disease in this country. Merck had been the only distributor of single component vaccines, which had always been difficult to obtain. It seemed that there were often shortages of either the measles, the mumps or the rubella single dose vaccines, which again just delayed vaccination. After many meetings with both the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Committee on Infectious Diseases, Merck has announced that it will no longer produce single antigen component measles, mumps or rubella vaccines.

Studies have confirmed that combination vaccines like MMR are not only safe, but are an important way to improve overall vaccine compliance and results in higher vaccine coverage. With the decision by Merck to stop producing single antigen vaccines, the MMR vaccine will become the only vaccine available for use and will help clear the “muddy” waters surrounding single antigen vaccine.

That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Related Posts on www.kidsdr.com

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