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The Questions About Fever Continue

by Sue Hubbard, M.D.

Back in the office today and boy is it busy. It seems like this has been going on a while with frantic phone calls and office visits. Many many of the questions are about fever.  You’ve heard me say before “fever is our friend”.

I am a firm believer that the more information a parent has the easier it is to make good decisions about the care of their child. This is true for fever fears too. So, here is more information beginning with the fact that you do not have to take your child to the pediatrician or ER every time your child has a fever.

Now, that is not to say that there are not times that you NEED to call the doctor’s office. But, fever in and of itself, in a child who is two years or older, who does not have an underlying chronic disease, and has classic symptoms of a “flu-like” illness, with headache, sore throat, cough and general “feels bad” does not require an immediate phone call to the doctor or an office visit. It does mean that you need to treat your child’s fever (NO ASPIRIN) to make them more comfortable, and make sure that they are hydrated and keep them home until they have been fever free for at least 24 hours.

That also means no fever off of all medications like acetaminophen and ibuprofen. Masking a fever with medications does not count. Watching Elmo or Disney for a few days while recovering is never bad for anyone. This is the one time to let them be couch potatoes.

Kids will always feel worse when their fever is higher, and better when it comes down with fever reducers. Being able to play with toys, play on the computer, Nintendo and Wii are all signs that your child is handling the virus and that they are not terribly sick. You should be watching for that, and be reassured, that is a good sign. Campbell’s chicken noodle soup should see record sales this fall and all of those other comfort foods like popsicles and smoothies sound good to those with a fever. Children usually do not want a full meal when they are feeling badly and neither will you if you are unlucky to also fall ill. Just push fluids and as your child feels better their appetite will return.

What to watch for! #1: Any signs of breathing difficulty, or color change in your child, but remember too that your chest can feel tight with the flu, without having respiratory distress. Take off their t-shirt or pajama top and really look at their chest to see if you see any difficulty breathing. Turn the light on if you are worried and look at their coloring. Fever also makes you breathe faster, so treat their fever and watch their respiratory rate as the fever comes down. A child playing a video game is usually not in respiratory distress (note from office visit today), and will be better off at home on the couch than waiting in an office full of more sick people.

#2: Any child who has a rebound fever is worrisome. That means they have the typical two to four days of fever, power through it and then several days later develop fever again. Those children should all be seen to rule out secondary infection.

#3: Children with prolonged fever, who seem to be worsening rather than getting better.

#4: Children with underlying chronic diseases need to be seen sooner rather than later (or at least warrant a phone call to discuss with their physician).

These are some guidelines to help reassure you that you are doing all of the right things at home. You can expect your child to be out of daycare or school for three to five days, minimum, so stock up with movies and cards and pretend that you are “snowed in”. Luckily the children we have been seeing thus far have not been too ill. I work in a pediatric office with 12 doctors, in a very busy practice, and we have not had one child hospitalized or even come back because they were getting sicker. We can only hope that this will be the case for the rest of this year.

Keep up the hand washing and go get those regular flu vaccines.

That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Related Posts on www.kidsdr.com

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One Response to “The Questions About Fever Continue”

  1. Great info! Fever can be scary, especially to new parents. Thanks for giving information in an easy-to-understand format. Awesome site!

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